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Cancer cells can reactivate a cellular process that is an essential part of embryonic development. This allows them to leave the primary tumor, penetrate the surrounding tissue and form metastases in peripheral organs. In the journal Nature Communications, researchers from the University of Basel's Department of Biomedicine provide an insight into the molecular networks that regulate this process.
McLean Hospital researchers found a connection between disrupted energy production and the development of late-onset Alzheimer's disease.
A particular long noncoding RNA gives viruses a replication boost as they infect their hosts, helping them alter their host cell's metabolism to their advantage, scientists report.
Researchers from Kyoto University iCeMS and Osaka University have made biodegradable aligned nanofibers as a scaffold for culturing cardiomyocytes (CMs) derived from human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs).
Japanese and American scientists have together designed a microdevice that efficiently promotes the formation of axon fascicles from stem cell-derived neurons. The 3-D structures are common in the body, but have proven difficult to prepare in the lab. The microdevice is expected to be a resourceful tool for drug discovery against neurodegeneration.
Scientists understand new details about the development of Th17, a type of immune cell that is believed to play a complex role in cancer, and is also implicated in autoimmune diseases.
Intriguing antitumor activity is found in a very promising class of natural compounds: cyclic depsipeptides, which have a challenging structure that makes their investigation difficult. Now, Chinese scientists have established the synthesis of a member compound, which is especially promising in killing pancreatic cancer stem cells. They describe its total synthesis and first test results in the journal Angewandte Chemie; the results point to an unprecedented activity towards one of the deadliest cancers.
Researchers at Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center and the University of Washington have developed a novel way to genetically engineer T cells that may be effective for treating and preventing leukemia relapse. The findings provide the basis for launching a first-in-human clinical trial of this new immunotherapy, which relies on engineered T-cell receptors, or TCRs.
Researchers at University of California San Diego School of Medicine report that a single infusion of wildtype hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs) into a mouse model of Friedreich's ataxia (FA) measurably halted cellular damage caused by the degenerative disease.
Researchers at the University Medical Center of Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz (JGU) have developed a promising technique that will facilitate the differentiation of stem cells into neurons.
Scientists from the RIKEN Center for Integrative Medical Sciences in Japan and international collaborators have found that in humanized mice, a cocktail of drugs blocking certain key pathways is effective in eliminating acute myeloid leukemia (AML), a disease which is estimated to kill more than 250,000 people a year around the world.
In the body, cells move around to form organs during development; to heal wounds; and when they metastasize from cancerous tumors. A mechanical engineer at Washington University in St. Louis found that cells remember the properties they had in their first environment for several days after they move to another in a process called mechanical memory.
Publishing their work in Nature, UNC School of Medicine researchers show how their new research platform helped them discover new cell subpopulations and crucial cellular players in the process of turning damaged heart tissue back into healthy heart muscle. The research platform could be used to study other biological processes and create tailored therapies.
In a new study published in Cell Systems, UNC Lineberger's Jeremy Purvis, PhD, and colleagues report that the timing of when DNA damage occurs within these different checkpoints matters to a cell's fate.
As the brain has limited capability for self-repair or regeneration, stem cells may represent the best therapeutic approach for counteracting damage to or degeneration of brain tissue caused by injury, aging, or disease.
A physiological approach to restore the gut's ecosystem in various diseases by using antimicrobial peptides has been developed by Hokkaido University scientists.
Nara Institute of Science and Technology-led research found the plant hormone auxin governs the change from cell division at shoot tips to the development of female parts of a flower. Auxin levels are themselves controlled by the CRABS CLAW protein, which joins forces with another protein to negatively regulate stem cell growth. This highly regulated process is essential for successful plant reproduction and could be manipulated to improve crop production.
Women diagnosed with breast cancer may benefit from having the molecular subtype of different cells within their tumors identified, argue two researchers in an opinion article published in Trends in Cancer. While breast cancer is often treated as a whole, they discuss the growing consensus that cancer cells within a tumor can have multiple origins and respond variably to treatment. The authors advocate for more accurate diagnostic tests to capture molecular irregularities between tumor cells.
In fairy tales, all it takes to transform a frog into a prince or a mouse into a horse is the wave of a magic wand. But in the real world, transforming one living thing into another isn't so easy. A new paper grounded in both math and biology lays out a way to do it with individual cells. If it works, it could have applications from regenerating diseased or lost tissue to fighting cancer.
Dr. Michell M. Reimer, group leader at the Center for Regenerative Therapies Dresden (CRTD), Cluster of Excellence at the TU Dresden, and his team introduce a novel, easy-to-use, and highly reproducible OPC culture platform for adult zebrafish cells. This system will help to unravel the molecular and cellular programs that enable zebrafish to functionally regenerate spinal cord injuries. The results of this study have been published in the scientific journal Frontiers in Cellular Neuroscience.