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For more than a century, the link between thyroid hormone and red blood cell production has remained elusive. Now Whitehead Institute researchers have teased about the mechanism that connects the two, which could help scientists identify new therapies for specific types of anemia.
Just as beauty exists in the eye of the beholder, a signal depends upon the interpretation of the receiver. According to new USC research published in Stem Cell Reports, a protein called TAZ can convey very different signals -- depending upon not only which variety of stem cell, but also which part of the stem cell receives it.
A surprising discovery that immune cells possess an internal warehouse of glycogen used to activate immune responses could help to increase immune activity in vaccines or suppress immune reactions in autoimmune disease or hyper-inflammatory conditions.
EPFL scientists show that the STING signaling pathway, which helps coordinate the innate immune system, causes cell death in T cells of the adaptive immune system. This 'killing' effect includes cancerous T cells, and has implications for treating T cell-derived cancers.
A Guam study highlights the need for experience in working with cycad and other endangered plants for successful conservation efforts.
Researchers have examined the potential benefits of melatonin, a hormone made by a small gland in the brain, for treating blood cancers such as leukemia and lymphoma.
A team of biologists has found an unexpected source for the brain's development, a finding that offers new insights into the building of the nervous system.
Researchers from Brigham and Women's Hospital want to prevent alpha-synuclein from accumulating in the brain. To do so, the team searched for drugs that turn down alpha-synuclein production. They then tested the drugs in mice and stem cells and studied in data from the health records of millions of people living in Norway. The results of their efforts, which point to a new drug development path for PD, are published in Science.
Drugs developed to treat heart and blood vessel problems could be used in combination with chemotherapy to treat an aggressive form of adult leukemia, new research led by the Francis Crick Institute reveals.
University of Bristol scientists have found that the delivery of a group of proteins involved in the information flow between the brain's nerve cells to the synapse is much more sophisticated than previously suspected. The findings, published in Cell Reports, will help the development of therapies for conditions such as epilepsy and autism whereby neuronal communication circuits malfunction.
An unexpected role for a white blood cell called the Natural Killer (NK) cell -- a critical cell for ridding the body of infection and cancer, has been discovered by researchers t New Zealand's University of Otago. The NK cell is a 'vigilante' killer -- a white blood cell that destroys invaders and cancer cells through a process of 'identity card' checking. The researchers' new work shows that violent vigilante NK cells act as helper cells to start up the immune response.
In a mouse study designed to understand how chronic inflammation in sinusitis damages the sense of smell, scientists at Johns Hopkins say they were surprised to learn that the regeneration of olfactory tissue requires some of the same inflammatory processes and chemicals that create injury and loss of smell in the first place.
A new biomedical tool using nanoparticles that deliver transient gene changes to targeted cells could make therapies for a variety of diseases -- including cancer, diabetes and HIV -- faster and cheaper to develop, and more customizable.
A Columbia Engineering team led by Professors Gordana Vunjak-Novakovic (Columbia Engineering) and N. Valerio Dorrello (Columbia University Medical Center) is the first to successfully bioengineer a functional lung with perfusable and healthy vasculature in an ex vivo rodent lung. Their new approach allows the removal of the pulmonary epithelium while maintaining the viability and function of the vascular network and the lung matrix (Science Advances).
St. Jude Children's Research Hospital is offering the global scientific community no-cost access to an unprecedented collection of pediatric solid tumor samples and data to fuel research and move treatment forward.
A team of Japanese neurosurgeons at the Center for iPS Cell Research and Application, Kyoto University, Japan, report two new strategies to improve outcomes of iPS cell-based therapies for Parkinson's disease in monkey brains. The findings are a key step for patient recruitment of the first iPS cell-based therapy to treat neurodegenerative diseases.
MIT engineers have devised a way to automate the process of patch-clamping, using a computer algorithm that analyzes microscope images and guides a robotic arm to the target cell to record its electrical activity.
A new review looks at the potential of fetal membranes, which make up the amniotic sac surrounding the fetus during pregnancy, for regenerative medicine.
Research into inherited human herpesvirus 6 identifies origins in a small number of people thousands of years ago and highlights the potential to 'reactivate.'
A new cell culture system that provides a tool for preclinical cancer drug development and screening has been developed by researchers in the USA. The team, led by scientists from Princeton University, N.J., created a microfluidic cell culture device that allows the direct, real-time observation of the development of drug resistance in cancer cells.