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A new study describes a unique bioengineered tissue construct, or organoid, into which colorectal cancer cells are embedded, creating a model of the tumor and surrounding extracellular matrix (ECM).
Lobachevsky University researchers are working to create a neurochip capable of transmitting a signal to healthy brain cells. The neurochip can be used in devices intended to replace damaged parts of the brain. First experiments have been conducted to transmit signals from an artificial neuron to living cells of the brain slice, demonstrating the possibility of interfacing between them.
The phenomenon of collective cell migration has been observed in the process of animal development, the healing of wounds, and cancer cell invasion. Professors Kazuhiro Aoki et al. of the National Institute for Basic Biology have found that when the activity of a molecule called ERK MAP kinase is propagated to neighboring cells, the cells migrate in the opposite direction of ERK propagation.
Children with an extremely deadly form of brain cancer might benefit from a new treatment that aims to direct an immune response against an abnormally shaped protein found exclusively on cancer cells, according to a new study led by UC San Francisco researchers.
If you've seen one GSK3 molecule, do not assume that you have seen them all. A new study in Developmental Cell reveals important differences in two similar forms of GSK3, which, in excess, is implicated in diabetes, cancer, Alzheimer's disease and ALS.
University of Bristol research has revealed how cells rebuild their nucleus and organise their genome when they divide -- a discovery which could have major implications for understanding cancer and degeneration.
Researchers at Tufts are examining the behavior of stem cells within the context of aging and loss of smell. In Cell Stem Cell, they report mechanisms to regenerate adult stem cells in mice to restore smell cells: it mimics induced pluripotency, but is simpler, involving only two Yamanaka factors.
You are what you eat when it comes to fat, report scientists from McGovern Medical School at The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston (UTHealth) in the journal Science Advances.
Chemical modification of DNA subunits contribute to the regulation of gene expression. Researchers from Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet (LMU) in Munich have now deciphered a new pathway can reactivate genes that have been silenced in this way, while avoiding the risk of damaging the DNA.
A serious infection of dietary origin that is caused by the Listeria monocytogenes bacterium, listeriosis is associated with severe clinical symptoms and a high mortality rate in individuals whose immune system is weakened. INRA scientists, working in collaboration with their colleagues at the Institut Pasteur, have demonstrated the novel capacity of L. monocytogenes to generate dormant intracellular forms that could be harboured, unsuspected, by their host. These findings are published on Nov. 30, 2017 in PLoS Pathogens.
How can damaged cardiac tissue following a heart attack best be treated with replacement muscle cells? A research team is now presenting an innovative method on mice: Muscle replacement cells, which are to take over the function of the damaged tissue, are loaded with magnetic nanoparticles. These cells are then injected into the damaged heart muscle and held in place by a magnet, causing the cells to engraft better onto the existing tissue.
Researchers using CT scans and 3-D printing have created accurate, custom-designed prosthetic replacements for damaged parts of the middle ear, according to a study being presented today at the annual meeting of the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA). The technique has the potential to improve a surgical procedure that often fails because of incorrectly sized prosthetic implants, researchers said.
A molecule that controls intestinal cell growth plays a dual role maintaining gut health and promoting diseases such as cancer, says a study in eLife.
Researchers from Harvard Medical School and the Institute of Systems Biology have discovered that the remains of tumor cells killed by chemotherapy or other cancer treatments can actually stimulate tumor growth by inducing an inflammatory reaction. The study, which will be published Nov. 30 in The Journal of Experimental Medicine, also reveals that a family of molecules called resolvins can suppress this unwanted inflammatory response, suggesting new ways to enhance the effectiveness of existing cancer therapies.
A certain type of cell in the bone marrow can help promote tumor growth in mice with early stage lung cancer, a new study finds.
Glioblastoma, the most common and aggressive form of brain cancer, typically fails to respond to treatment or rapidly becomes drug resistant. In a paper published online in the journal Cancer Cell on November 30, University of California San Diego School of Medicine researchers identified a strategy that pinpoints a genetically distinct subpopulation of patients with glioblastoma that is particularly sensitive to drugs like cilengitide that target a cell adhesion receptor known as integrin αvβ3.
A modified version of iPS methodology, called interrupted reprogramming, allows for a highly controlled, safer, and more cost-effective strategy for generating progenitor-like cells from adult cells. As demonstrated in Stem Cell Reports, researchers converted adult mouse respiratory tract cells called Club cells into large, pure populations of induced progenitor-like cells, which retained a residual memory of their parental cell lineage. Moreover, these cells showed potential as a cell replacement therapy in mice with cystic fibrosis.
The varied sex lives of a type of green algae have enabled a University of Adelaide researcher to test a theory of why there are males and females.
Uncovering a surprising new function for a commonly studied hormone, Balázs Mayer and colleagues have determined that vasopressin does more than maintain fluid balance for the kidneys -- it also stimulates red blood cell production.
A stem cell-derived in vitro model displays key small intestine characteristics including innate immune responses, according to a study published Nov. 29, 2017, in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Ying Chen and David Kaplan from Tufts University, US, and colleagues.