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Results from a phase 2 clinical trial, presented by Seattle Children's Research Institute at the 59th American Society of Hematology (ASH) Annual Meeting, show that the drug Abatacept (Orencia) nearly eliminated life-threatening severe acute graft-versus-host disease (GvHD) in patients receiving hematopoietic stem cell transplants.
Immunotherapy agents known as checkpoint inhibitors have shown considerable promise in patients with hematologic cancers who relapse after a transplant with donor stem cells. Preliminary results from the first clinical trial in these patients of one such agent -- nivolumab -- indicate that along with signs of effectiveness, it also produced significant side effects at the dose initially studied. The findings indicate a need for further clinical trials in this group before being considered for off-label use with these patients, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute investigators report.
A group of investigators from Mayo Clinic and multiple academic research centers in Italy have identified a genetic model for predicting outcomes in patients with primary myelofibrosis who are 70 years or younger and candidates for stem cell transplant to treat their disease. The group's findings were presented today at the 59th American Society of Hematology annual meeting in Atlanta by lead authors Alessandro Vannucchi, M.D., from the University of Florence and Ayalew Tefferi, M.D., a hematologist at Mayo Clinic.
Preliminary findings indicate gene therapy pioneered at St. Jude Children's Research Hospital is safe and effective for babies with a devastating inherited disorder that leaves them with little or no immune protection.
Scientists from the University of Surrey have produced non-metal electro-catalysts for fuel cells that could pave the way for production of low-cost, environmentally friendly energy generation.
A research team led by faculty at Binghamton University, State University of New York has developed an entirely textile-based, bacteria-powered bio-battery that could one day be integrated into wearable electronics.
a team of scientists from VCU Massey Cancer Center have shown a genetic relationship between the reactivation of the human cytomegalovirus and the onset of graft-versus-host disease (GVHD), a potentially deadly condition in which the immune system attacks healthy tissue following a bone marrow or stem cell transplant.
Now researchers at UC San Francisco have taken the first step towards a comprehensive atlas of gene expression in cells across the developing human brain, making available new insights into how specific cells and gene networks contribute to building this most complex of organs, and serving as a resource for researchers around the world to study the interplay between these genetic programs and neurodevelopmental disorders such as autism, intellectual disability, and schizophrenia.
Scientists have previously shown that a parasite from cats can infect people's brain and affect our behaviour. Now, researchers at Stockholm University have discovered how the parasite takes control of our cells.
Adult stem cells replenish dying cells and regenerate damaged tissues throughout our lifetime. We lose many of those stem cells, along with their regenerative capacity, as we age. Working in flies and mice, researchers discovered that TOR, a nutrient sensing pathway which is central to the aging process, drives the loss of adult stem cells. Treating mice with the TOR-inhibitor rapamycin prevented this loss and could reverse age-related loss of stem cells in mouse trachea.
A new method of harvesting stem cells for bone marrow transplantation -- developed by a team of investigators from the Massachusetts General Hospital Cancer Center and the Harvard Stem Cell Institute -- may make the donation process more convenient and less unpleasant for donors while providing cells that are superior to those acquired by current protocols.
A series of studies led by Monash University researcher Associate Professor Jose Polo have this week shed light on vital, yet previously unclear, aspects of cell reprogramming.
Researchers at the Cancer Science Institute of Singapore (CSI Singapore) at the National University of Singapore (NUS) have identified a novel molecular pathway by which a tumour suppressor, TIP60, inhibits the growth of cancer cells.
The technique, which could be used to transplant donor-matched hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) or a patient's own genetically-engineered HSCs into the brain, was reported in Science Advances today by researchers from the Dana-Farber/Boston Children's Cancer and Blood Disorders Center and the San Raffaele Telethon Institute for Gene Therapy.
Houston Methodist is making mini brains from human stem cells, putting researchers on a fast track to repair the nervous system after injury or disease of the brain and spinal cord. Researchers have developed a new system to reduce the time it takes to grow these brain models, which will give them the ability to screen drugs and study what's behind disease-causing mutations more quickly. The findings appear Dec. 12 in Stem Cell Reports.
A drug already used to treat certain forms of cancer appears to be an effective therapy for Huntington's disease, and offers a potential pathway to treat other neurodegenerative diseases.
A study published today in Science Advances shows for the first time the efficacy of a new gene therapy transplantation technique which aims at repopulating the brain with new, genetically engineered immune cells.
Using a database of multiple myeloma patient samples and information, researchers at University of California San Diego School of Medicine found that high ADAR1 levels correlate with reduced survival rates. They also determined that blocking the enzyme reduces multiple myeloma regeneration in experimental models derived from patient cancer cells.
Researchers report creating a biologically accurate mass-production platform that overcomes major barriers to bioengineering human liver tissues suitable for therapeutic transplant into people. A team led by the Cincinnati Children's Center for Stem Cell and Organoid Medicine (CuSTOM) and Yokohama City University in Japan report their findings Dec. 5 in Cell Reports. The study overcomes what have been nagging challenges for researchers working to bioengineer human organs that are safe and effective for therapeutic use.
A study led by Indiana University researchers found a previously undetected link between the gene that causes fragile X syndrome and increased tissue growth in the intestines of fruit flies modified to model the disease.