Stem Cell Commons

Promoting Discovery and Reproducibility in Stem Cell Research

User Top Menu

Search experiments

News

St. Jude Children's Research Hospital study reports that blood production is founded on an unexpectedly large number of precursor cells, offering insight into origins of blood diseases that strike early in life.
The engine used by cancer-killing 'Natural Killer' cells is turned on by a protein called Srebp, which can be blocked by certain sterols like cholesterol. Tumor cells can produce oxysterols and cholesterol levels tend to be higher in people with obesity.
Oxygen starvation could toughen up immune T cells for cancer immunotherapy.
Cells can be programmed like a computer to fight cancer, influenza, and other serious conditions -- thanks to a breakthrough in synthetic biology by the University of Warwick.
NUS scientists discovered that a combination of artemisinin, which is a potent anti-malarial drug, and aminolaevulinic acid, which is a photosensitizer, could kill colorectal cancer cells and suppress tumor growth more effectively than administering artemisinin alone. This novel combination therapy could also have fewer side effects.
Researchers used gene transfer to block the expression of one of the two main enzymes that break down alcohol in the liver, leading to the accumulation in liver cells of acetaldehyde, a metabolic byproduct of ethanol.
Rutgers scientists say a new study indicates that the excessive burst of new brain cells after a traumatic head injury that researchers have traditionally believed helped in recovery could instead lead to epileptic seizures and long-term cognitive decline.
A new study shows unequivocally that stem cells in the ovaries are a critical piece of the mammal fertility puzzle, and may be harnessed to revolutionize fertility treatments and perhaps even delay menopause.
Researchers from the Mayo Clinic have proposed that negative cellular responses to titanium-based nanoparticles released from metal implants interfere in bone formation and resorption at the site of repair, resulting in implant loosening and joint pain.
In the centenary year of the publication of a seminal treatise on the physical and mathematical principles underpinning nature -- 'On Growth and Form' by D'Arcy Wentworth Thompson -- a Cambridge physicist has led a study describing an elegantly simple solution to a puzzle that has taxed biologists for centuries: how complex branching patterns of tissues arise.
Parkinson's disease and prion diseases are very different from each other as regards both origins and course. Nonetheless, a research group of SISSA's has discovered an unexpected and important link between the two pathologies. According to the study recently published in the journal Scientific Reports, the link is given by the complex interaction between two different proteins present in our nerve cells: the so-called α-synuclein, in its aggregated form, and the prion protein PrPC.
Researchers found a possible new treatment for aggressive triple receptor-negative breast cancer.
The largest genomic profiling study ever conducted into a type of brain tumor known as glioma in children has identified genetic alterations in 96% of cases. As reported in The Oncologist, this genetic information could help to identify the most effective treatments for specific cases of glioma, hopefully improving the prognosis for what is currently the leading cause of death for children with cancer in the US.
Obese women with large bellies may be at risk of developing a different subtype of breast cancer than those with widespread fat accumulation, according to a new study published in The Oncologist. This suggests that the link between breast cancer and obesity may be more complex than previously thought.
A growing body of clinical evidence shows that transplantation of a patient's own mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) to achieve a cure and prevent recurrent of Crohn's disease-related fistula can be a safe and effective addition to surgery.
Salk scientists find interaction between two key proteins regulates development of neurons.
In response to infection the immune system produces unique antibodies to target each illness. To make these new antibodies, cells in the immune system must intentionally damage their own genes, meaning they run the risk of becoming cancer cells. New research from the Babraham Institute reveals how a proteins called Tia1 acts as a hair-trigger for DNA repair, allowing the immune system to walk the line between health and harm.
New research has shown that the success of transplanting stem cells into the brain to regenerate tissue damaged by stroke may depend on the maturity of the neuronal precursor cells used for transplantation.
Scientists at Kazan Federal University's Institute of Fundamental Medicine and Biology, led by Professor Albert Rizvanov, have shown that artificial membrane vesicles generated by cytochalasin B treatment of human cells retain angiogenic activity.
A UK charity backs a pioneering new project to prevent childhood deafness following treatment with life-saving cancer drugs.